Life Insurance

In its simplest form, life insurance is a promise between an insurance company and you, the policy owner. If you pay a certain amount of money (premium) to the insurance company, the insurance company will pay a certain amount of money (death benefit) to the person (beneficiary) you tell us to when the person whose life is being insured dies.

There are many types of life insurance. Term insurance only provides a death benefit for a limited period of time. By contrast permanent insurance can provide a death benefit and the potential to build policy cash value that you can access during your lifetime using policy loans and withdrawals.1 Permanent insurance can also offer the flexibility to increase or decrease your death benefit as your needs change, as well as the potential to reduce or skip premium payments.2

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These policies are designed for individuals who want guarantees and who are focused on providing death benefit protection over cash value accumulation.

Offers

  • Guaranteed death benefit3
  • Guaranteed cash value
  • Potential additional cash value by the receipt of any dividends declared by the company. Although not guaranteed, dividend payments are generally declared annually by the company.
  • Level premiums that are guaranteed to never change.

May be ideal for the consumer who has a need for life insurance, is somewhat conservative, and wants the guarantees of a fixed, minimum interest rate with the potential for additional interest credits.

Increasing the death benefit may be subject to additional underwriting approval.

Offers

  • Flexible death benefit
  • Flexible premium
  • Policy cash values are credited a current interest rate that is set by the insurance company and which is subject to change but it will never be lower than a guaranteed minimum interest rate.3

May be ideal for those who need death benefit protection but are focused on cash value accumulation for lifetime needs such as supplementing retirement income.

Increasing the death benefit may be subject to additional underwriting approval.

Offers

  • Flexible death benefit
  • Flexible premium
  • Cash value grows based on an interest crediting strategy that is tied to changes in a market index such as the S&P 500.4
  • Downside protection through minimum guarantees3 to ensure that your cash value will not decline due to decreases in the Index.

This policy design is for the customer who needs life insurance but would like to have the ability to choose how their cash value is invested.

Variable policies are underwritten by National Life and distributed by Equity Services, Inc., Registered Broker/Dealer Affiliate of National Life Insurance Company, One National Life Drive, Montpelier, Vermont 05604.

Increasing the death benefit may be subject to additional underwriting approval.

Variable contracts are sold by prospectus. For more complete information, please request a prospectus from your registered representative or call 1-800-732-8939. Please read it and consider carefully a Fund’s objectives, risks, charges and expenses before you invest or send money. The prospectus contains this and other information about the investment company.

Guarantees are dependent upon the claims-paying ability of the insurer and do not protect the value of the variable product portfolios, which may fluctuate. Variable policy holders are subject to investment risks, including the possible loss of principal invested.

Offers

  • Flexible death benefit
  • Flexible premium
  • Cash value grows based on the performance of the professionally managed stock, bond and money market sub-accounts that you choose. You can design a portfolio to match your comfort level and risk tolerance. Policy cash values fluctuate based the sub accounts in which you are invested and may lose value, including principal.

May make sense for those with budget limitations, have large protection needs or have a temporary need.

Offers:

  • Guaranteed death benefit for a fixed period3
  • Fixed premium.
  • No cash value.
  • Coverage is for a certain period of time (term), usually for a specified number of years or to a specific age of the insured.
  • Initial premiums tend to be lower but will eventually increase.
I know what type of life insurance I want, how do I buy it?

Before you can purchase life insurance, you need to qualify for it.

We will ask you to provide us with information that we then use in what is called underwriting. This is the process that an insurance company uses to determine the risk of insuring your life. The healthier you are and the fewer risks you take, will positively impact your policy.

First, we will confidentially ask about your height, weight, date of birth, lifestyle habits (i.e., smoking, drinking, exercise), and in order to make sure you are not asking for too much life insurance protection, we will also ask for financial information, including your annual income. If we need more information, you may be asked to take a physical exam at our expense and at your convenience, typically at your home or office.

We do all of this in order to have the most complete picture of you.

Second, all of this information is provided to an underwriter, this is someone who is specially trained to assess your application and determine what risk, if any, exists. Once all of your information has been reviewed, the company will either approve or deny your request. That process can take days or weeks depending on the information received.

Lastly, your agent will contact you and go over the results of your underwriting and details of your policy.

  1. Policy loans and withdrawals reduce the policy’s cash value and death benefit and may result in a taxable event. Withdrawals up to the basis paid into the contract and loans thereafter will not create an immediate taxable event, but substantial tax ramifications could result upon contract lapse or surrender. Surrender charges may reduce the policy's cash value in early years.
  2. It is possible that coverage will expire when either no premiums are paid following the initial premium, or subsequent premiums are insufficient to continue coverage.
  3. Guarantees are dependent upon the claims-paying ability of the issuing company.
  4. “Standard and Poor’s®,” “S&P®,” “Standard and Poor’s 500,” and “500” are trademarks of Standard & Poor’s and have been licensed for use by Life Insurance Company of the Southwest. The product is not sponsored, endorsed, sold or promoted by S&P and S&P makes no representation regarding the advisability of investing in this Product. The S&P Composite Index of 500 stocks (S&P 500®) is a group of unmanaged securities widely regarded by investors to be representative of large-company stocks in general. An investment cannot be made directly into an index.
  5. The use of trusts involves complex tax rules and regulations. Consider enlisting the counsel of an estate planning professional and qualified professional legal and tax advisors prior to implementing such sophisticated strategies.
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