Life Insurance

In its simplest form, life insurance is a promise between an insurance company and you, the policy owner. If you pay a certain amount of money (premium) to the insurance company, the insurance company will pay a certain amount of money (death benefit) to the person (beneficiary) you tell us to when the person whose life is being insured dies.

There are many types of life insurance. Term insurance only provides a death benefit for a limited period of time. By contrast permanent insurance can provide a death benefit and the potential to build policy cash value that you can access during your lifetime using policy loans and withdrawals.1 Permanent insurance can also offer the flexibility to increase or decrease your death benefit as your needs change, as well as the potential to reduce or skip premium payments.2

Types of Permanent Life Insurance:

Whole Life Insurance

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Universal Life Insurance

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Indexed Universal Life Insurance

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Variable Universal Life Insurance

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Term Insurance

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I know what type of life insurance I want, how do I buy it?

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1. Policy loans and withdrawals reduce the policy’s cash value and death benefit and may result in a taxable event. Withdrawals up to the basis paid into the contract and loans thereafter will not create an immediate taxable event, but substantial tax ramifications could result upon contract lapse or surrender. Surrender charges may reduce the policy's cash value in early years.

2. It is possible that coverage will expire when either no premiums are paid following the initial premium, or subsequent premiums are insufficient to continue coverage.

3. Guarantees are dependent upon the claims-paying ability of the issuing company.

4. “Standard and Poor’s®,” “S&P®,” “Standard and Poor’s 500,” and “500” are trademarks of Standard & Poor’s and have been licensed for use by Life Insurance Company of the Southwest. The product is not sponsored, endorsed, sold or promoted by S&P and S&P makes no representation regarding the advisability of investing in this Product. The S&P Composite Index of 500 stocks (S&P 500®) is a group of unmanaged securities widely regarded by investors to be representative of large-company stocks in general. An investment cannot be made directly into an index.

5. The use of trusts involves complex tax rules and regulations. Consider enlisting the counsel of an estate planning professional and qualified professional legal and tax advisors prior to implementing such sophisticated strategies.

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